The Fork Model: How to Empower Others

I recently learned about the Fork Model. My mentor sent me the web address and said it might be of interest. Enjoy this excerpt from the home page:

“The ultimate purpose of helping clients is not only that clients’ goals are reached or their problems solved, but that they become empowered citizens and cultural creatives.”

One part of my vision is to enable and empower clients so they can in turn impact others in the organization, expanding the influence of correct principles to more people so better quality work will be seen in all departments.

There are four parts to the Fork Model:

  1. Self-guidance
  2. Goal-oriented project
  3. Identity and personal development
  4. Development of the whole to which you belong

How can we use these principles when advising others?

Passionate Leadership

I read an article today by Erika Andersen on Forbes.com entitled, “Passionate Leaders Aren’t Loud – They’re Deep.” Andersen discusses great leadership as not loud speechmaking, but something deeper, in six qualities. Passionate leaders are:

  • Honest and genuine
  • Clear and powerful, yet respectful
  • Open to others’ points of view
  • Walking their talk
  • Committed despite adversity and setbacks

The the most important principle Andersen brings up is purpose. “What a leader is passionate,” she says, “people feel a deep sense of being led in a worthy direction by someone who is committed to something more important than his or her own individual glory.”

Purpose

“Successful companies keep this idea front and center: People seek purpose.” – Rich Karlgaard, Forbes.com, “Purpose-Driven Leadership

In the same Forbes article, Karlgaard lists two examples of why purpose is so important:

“Abraham Maslow had it right. Once our physical needs are met, we long for love, belonging, esteem and finally what Maslow called ‘self-actualization’–that our lives count.”

I seek for purpose in my work. I don’t want just to “get tasks done.” I want to make a difference, meaning a great positive impact, in the world.

Reworking the vision

I’ve been traveling down a path with a certain vision. However, it’s time for a few tweaks. I realized something very important: much of my vision depended on others. If I have a vision for who I want to be, it can’t all depend on others. For example, part of the vision is to “be respected.” Do I fail if no one chooses to respect me?

However, at the same time, I also know that we should be interdependent beings, not islands attempting to achieve something all on our own.

Therefore, I want to be clear with myself on what is in my power and what involves the free will of others.

Old vision

As a thought leader I am:

  • respectful and respected
  • balanced and effective
  • enabling and vulnerable
  • boundless with knowledge, yet succinct
  • relaxed with harnessed passion

New vision

I am:

  • happy and fulfilled
  • passionate and peaceful
  • balanced and effective

As an influencer, I am:

  • respectful and respected
  • enabling and vulnerable
  • boundless with knowledge, yet succinct

Leadership

I’m reading the article 6 Things Really Powerful Leaders Do, which obviously talks about leadership and principles by which leaders should live. One, “Be generous to your tribe,” outlines a few ways to be generous to those whom you hope to influence:

  • Share your learnings along the way
  • Include them in the process
  • Show gratitude
  • Give recognition
  • Encourage
  • Work synergistically